ARCUS Project 2018 IBARAKI / Artist-in-Residence Program

We are pleased to announce the following artists who have been selected for ARCUS Project 2018 IBARAKI, Artist-in-Residence Program. This year, we received 665 applications from 85 countries/regions for the open call. The artists will arrive in Japan on August 24 (Fri.) and participate in the artist-in-residence program till December 11 (Tue.) (110 days).

Cihad Caner (Turkey)

Erika Ceruzzi (USA)

Erica van Loon (The Netherlands)

The final selection has been made by Kodama Kanazawa (Guest Curator 2018 / Independent Curator / Senior Deputy Director of Curatorial Affairs, Towada Art Center), Fumio Nanjo (ARCUS Project Adviser / Director of Mori Art Museum) and the ARCUS Project Administration Committee.

Cihad Caner (Turkey)

ジハド・ジャネル


[Selected Exhibitions and Activities]
2018 ‘Hauntology’, ONONO, Rotterdam, Netherlands
2017 ‘DIY Survival Kit’, Corridor Project Space, Amsterdam, Netherlands
2017 ‘What Happens to the Geographical Borders When the Lands Itself Moves’, Blitz, Valetta, Malta
2017 ‘Recontres Internationales Paris/Berlin’, Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin, Germany
2017 Portfolio Review Award, Düsseldorf, Germany

ジハド・ジャネル

Abstract Violence
Video, 11′14″, sculpture
2016

ジハド・ジャネル

DIY Survival Kit
Video, 01′52″ loop
2017

ジハド・ジャネル

A Haunted Biscuit and The Spectre of The Glorious Past
Sculpture
2018

Born in Istanbul, Turkey in 1990. Lives and works in Istanbul and Rotterdam, Netherlands. Caner studied photojournalism at Marmara University (Istanbul) and then media design and communication at Piet Zwart Institute (Rotterdam). Experiences as a photojournalist in Turkey gave Caner an awareness of ethical issues involved in producing and presenting heartrending images of war, and prompted a search for alternatives to the current state of society, in which people are flooded with images at unprecedented speed. Caner has primarily dealt with war, conflict, immigration, and resistance, and has produced and presented videos, 3D animation, sculpture, and installations with the motifs drawn from war-devastated communities and objects collected there.

[Reasons for Selection]
“How can we describe reality? In this era of instant visual culture, is it even possible to discuss reality?” Caner’s philosophical questions grew out of a career as a photojournalist covering warzones, and took on great urgency for the artist. In the ARCUS Project, he will research monsters appearing in a 13th-century book by a Persian scholar and Japanese “yokai” (supernatural monsters and spirits), create avatars, and produce animated works. I have high expectations for the results of his exploration of representations of “the Other” and narrative protagonists in a different cultural context.

Erika Ceruzzi (USA)

エリカ・セルジ

(Photo by Tyler Jones)


[Selected Exhibitions and Activities]
2017 ‘Amber Inclusion’, Low Rence, San Francisco, CA, USA
2017 ‘Sleepers’, Hel Galery, New York, NY, USA
2016 ‘Laundered Fang’, Springsteen, Baltimore, MD, USA
2016 ‘Wrath Binned Face Pinned’, Et al, San Francisco, CA, USA
2015 ‘Menswear’, The Still House Group, Brooklyn, NY, USA

エリカ・セルジ

Entry Right
Sculpture
2016

エリカ・セルジ

Menswear
Installation
2015

エリカ・セルジ

D?alias Backflip
Embroidery and ink on canvas
2016

Born in Maryland, USA in 1990. Lives and works in New York, USA. Ceruzzi studied fine arts at the Cooper Union (New York). Ceruzzi modifies industrial materials and produces sculptures that subvert the materials’ original purposes and functions. She has created sculptures and installations with combinations of industrial and crafts materials such as aluminum pipe, cables, fabric and paper. In recent years she has also worked with embroidery. Although focused on sculpture, the artist’s practice is expanding, and she has produced installations featuring striking interpretations of spaces, and works in which visitors can detach parts of the work and wrap it around their arms. Thus far she has primarily worked and exhibited in the US.

[Reasons for Selection]
In her proposal, Ceruzzi cites research on silk. This includes study of 1) silkworms that produce spider web thread, which are being developed for military purposes in the US, 2) genetically modified silkworms in Japan, 3) the historical context of Japanese sericulture, such as the Tomioka Silk Mill. The breadth and depth of perspectives suggested by these subjects are intriguing. Also, Ceruzzi describes her approach thus far as “poetic” and has been working with fabric as a one of her main sculptural materials, but now she intends to focus on one particular type of fabric, and broaden her horizons to incorporate sociopolitical and scientific investigation. I would like to support this ambitious effort.

Erica van Loon (The Netherlands)

イリカ・ファン・ローン

(Photo by Tim Mintiens)


[Selected Exhibitions and Activities]
2018 ‘LABVERDE - Arts Immersion Program in the Amazon', Adolpho Ducke Forest Reserve, Manaus, Brazil
2017 ‘Helicotrema - Recorded Audio Festival', Palazzo Grassi, Venice, Italy
2017 ‘2017 Site-Responsive Art Residency & Biennale', I-Park Foundation, East Haddam, CT, USA
2016 ‘Breakfast Show', puntWG, Amsterdam, Netherlands
2016 ‘Mano Y Mano', Kunsthuis SYB at Intersections - Art Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands

イリカ・ファン・ローン

Your Brain Has No Smell
Audio-installation, 36′
2017

イリカ・ファン・ローン

A Body Is Not a Part of a Head
Video, 7′49″
2016

イリカ・ファン・ローン

Microcosmic Orbit
Drawing and book (Walden by H.D. Thoreau published by the Scott Library in 1854)
2012

Born in Meppel, Netherlands in 1978. Lives and works in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Van Loon studied architectural design at ArtEZ University of the Arts (Kampen) and fine art at Gerrit Rietveld Academy (Amsterdam) and De Ateliers (Amsterdam). She has participated in residency programs in Canada, Switzerland, the US and elsewhere. Van Loon is interested in physical links between humans and the earth, activities inside the earth that we cannot see or only perceive indirectly and the human unconscious. She has thus far produced sound, video, and photography works, as well as installations that combine these media. In her works, the artist aims for effects that heighten viewers’ perceptions through repeated actions and rhythms and strengthen their ability to find connections between the exterior ecosystem and the interior of the human body.

[Reasons for Selection]
Incorporating interviews with geologists and anatomists into her work, Van Loon conveys a holistic worldview by combining scientific viewpoints with visual, sound and other ingredients derived from nature, as well as metaphorical elements. I find an appealing freshness in her unique approach. Her proposal has the theme of “couples therapy” between the earth and humans, and involves researching the natural environment of Ibaraki and producing new works of art. I have high hopes for her establishment of creative communication with the surrounding environment, including the local community. This “communication” may take forms that we could not have imagined.

Overall Summary of 2018 Selection

This year was the first time an age limit of 40 was set, and this was expected to reduce the number of applicants, but I am happy to say that in the end ARCUS Project received 665 applications. On the other hand, as I carried out the evaluation process, I felt it somewhat unfortunate that there were many submissions that only made sense within the relatively narrow context of fine art. Who is the art intended for, who do you want to reach, what do you want to say... naturally there are no easy answers to these questions, but in artist-in-residence programs, I would always like to witness artists breaking out of shells of self-satisfaction and self-protection. With this in mind, these three artists were selected for the correspondence between their concepts and their modes of expression, as well as the contemporary relevance of their concerns, which I believe will make their work appeal to more diverse audiences.

Kodama Kanazawa
(Guest Curator 2018 / Independent Curator / Senior Deputy Director of Curatorial Affairs, Towada Art Center)

Guest Curator 2018

Kodama Kanazawa

Kodama Kanazawa (Independent Curator/ Senior Deputy Director of Curatorial Affairs, Towada Art Center)
Born in 1973. She holds MA from the Graduate School of Tokyo University of the Arts and the Royal College of Art, UK. After working for 12 years in public art museums in Japan, she began working independently in 2013. From April 2017, she has also been working as senior deputy director of curatorial affairs at Towada Art Center, Aomori, Japan. In practice, her interest manifests in the topics of self-imposed cultural imperialism in modern and contemporary Japan, globalisation and media arts from the world, which have been expressed in over 40 exhibitions, both domestic and overseas, during her career. Recent curatorial projects include ‘Spectrum’ (Spiral, Tokyo, 2015), KENPOKU ART 2016 (Ibaraki, 2016), ‘Han Ishu: Drifting Thinker’ (MoCA Pavilion, Shanghai, 2017), ‘Rafaël Rozendaal: GENEROSITY’ (Towada Art Center, Aomori, 2018) and ‘CHILDHOOD: Another banana day for the dream-fish’ (Palais de Tokyo, Paris, 2018).

The Call for the ARCUS Project 2018 IBARAKI Artist-in-Residence Program was closed on April 27, 2018.
The next open call will be announced on our website in March 2019.

Exchange Residency Program 2018

[Partner Institution]
Hospitalfield〈UK〉

[Period]
September 4 to October 2

[Referrer]
Naoko Horiuchi (Curator, Arts Initiative Tokyo [AIT])

[Selection]
Two artists were chosen by the referrer and the ARCUS Project Administration Committee among the artists who have Japanese nationality for this Exchange Residency Program.

Natsumi Aoyagi

Natsumi Aoyagi

Photo by Shintaro Wada


[Selected Exhibitions and Activities]
2018 ‘Incubation Diary 2014-2015’, The Yebisu International Festival for Art & Alternative Visions 2018, Tokyo Photographic Art Museum, Tokyo
2016 ‘Incubation Diary 2011, 2014-2016’, NTT InterCommunication Center [ICC], Tokyo
2016 ‘Fuji Diary’, NADiff Gallery, Tokyo
2016 ‘Incubation Diary Taiwan’, kanzan gallery, Tokyo
2015 WRO Biennale 2015, Wroclaw, Poland

Natsumi Aoyagi

Calendar story for HouseFriend
Video 30′
2018

Natsumi Aoyagi

Incubation Diary 2014-2015
Installation
2015/2018
©The Yebisu International Festival for Art & Alternative Visions 2018: Mapping the Invisible,
Tokyo Photographic Art Museum
Photo by OSHIMA Kenichiro

Natsumi Aoyagi

Incubation Diary 2014-2015
Installation
2015/2018
©The Yebisu International Festival for Art & Alternative Visions 2018: Mapping the Invisible,
Tokyo Photographic Art Museum
Photo by OSHIMA Kenichiro

Born in Tokyo in 1990. Lives and works in Tokyo. Aoyagi obtained her Master of Fine Arts in Film and New Media from Tokyo University of the Arts in 2016. While observing the development process of a wide range of things, including insects, familiar people, plants, and landscapes, Aoyagi searches for ways of expressing these things without relying on any specific media. Aoyagi employs methods that seem to provide viewers with the experience of seeing things exactly as she does, and deals with the subject of their inability to actually do this. She also makes work under the name “Datsuo” and serves as the director of a media production team called honkbooks in Tokyo.

[Referrer's comment]
Focusing on insects, plants, and familiar environments, Aoyagi’s installation consists of videos, photographs, and actual insect and other specimens. While making use of a regular observational method akin to the research projects undertaken school children during their summer vacation, Aoyagi’s includes elements from her everyday life, creating a chaotic space imbued with a mixture of observer and observed, and the media used to record them.
Scotland is home to expansive untouched natural landscapes, including spacious wetlands and luxuriant woods, and the country has retained countless legends of witches and fairies. After coming into contact with these natural areas and narratives, it will be interesting to see what kind of subjects Aoyagi discovers and what kind of spaces she creates, while incorporating aspects of them of her daily life, after returning to Japan.

Kazuya Takagawa

高川和也


[Selected Exhibitions and Activities]
2017 ‘Socially Engaged Art: A New Wave of Art for Social Change’, 3331 Arts Chiyoda, Tokyo
2017 Artist in Residence Kyoto: Re-Search, Kyoto
2016 ‘ASK THE SELF’, Tokyo Arts and Space Hongo, Tokyo
2015 3331 ART FAIR 2015, 3331 Arts Chiyoda, Tokyo

Kazuya Takagawa

Ask the self
Single-channel video installation
2015
©Tokyo Arts and Space
Photo by Kenji Takahashi

Kazuya Takagawa

CONSENSUS
Workshop
2014

Kazuya Takagawa

Practice for identification
Multi-channel video installation
2014

Born in Kumamoto in 1986. Lives and works in Tokyo. Takagawa obtained his Master of Fine Arts in Painting from Tokyo University of the Arts in 2012. Based the theme of “the self as a space that is confronted or unified by information,” in recent years, Takagawa has produced works using videos, drawings, and texts while referencing psychological and psychopathological methodologies. For Voicing the Extreme, a project he began in 2017, he studied collections of verbal utterances and their psychological effects.

[Referrer's comment]
While referencing philosophy and psychiatry, Takagawa makes works that might be referred to as psychological experiments. By drawing slightly closer to the other and the elusive, ambiguous existence of the self, Takagawa’s work displays his efforts to hone his sensitivity toward the incomprehensible other.
Using the theme of language as a means of enduring despair, Takagawa has in recent years assembled a collection of words from various eras, places, and experiences, including notes by those who experienced war, diaries by young people struggling with depression, and verbal expressions by rappers whose identities were molded by being a foreign resident of Japan.
By continuing his research on the same theme, which he explored during his residency in Scotland, it will be interesting to see how Takagawa’s experiences affect his imaginative approach to the multilayered and highly complex other that dwells beyond the fragmentation of communication and the impossibility of translation.